Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (2/2)

In Part 1 I argued that career satisfaction is built, not found.  The implicit problem is that if expertise tends to precede true passion, and world-class experts spend at least 10,000 hours honing their crafts, where along the trajectory of career development can we say, “I have given it a fair chance, and it is time to move on”? Continue reading “Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (2/2)”

Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (2/2)

Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (1/2)

In 2005, the late Steve Jobs delivered a memorable speech to graduates of Stanford University partly on the theme of career dreams.  “If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle,” said him, adding that “Money will come.”  After the housing bubble burst and lots of dream-chasers their lost jobs in 2007, I stumbled upon a 2008 Business Week article titled “Personality and the Perfect Job.”  Books titled along the same themes, such as Do What You Are follow a similar paradigm as well.  For those who needed a faster fix, the internet offered solutions too.  Stuck in life?  Oprah has a 28-question quiz to find who you really want to be!

The implication is clear: if you failed, it’s because that was not your real passion; pick another dream.

Over the past year, I began to wonder whether the endless pursuit for pre-existing passions is missing the mark altogether.


Photo Credit: Urbanesia.com

Continue reading “Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (1/2)”

Why “pursuing your dream” is wrong (1/2)

[Footnote] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces

In a prior post I began to describe how Michael Porter’s Five Forces, a mainstay in corporate strategy, can be applied to analyze why my brother cannot seem to finish the Harry Potter series and why I have a mounting pile of books on my to-read list.

The analogy between organizational attention and reading works because our minds run on attention span a lot like how organizations run on currency and resources.
Continue reading “[Footnote] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces”

[Footnote] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces

[Part 1/3] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces

My brother has been trying to finish a book for three years, and I have been trying to figure out why for two years and eleven months.  What is stopping you from finishing that great book sitting on the coffee table? Continue reading “[Part 1/3] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces”

[Part 1/3] Reading through the Lens of Porter’s Five Forces