One reason is plenty, two is too many

If you have more than one reason to do something … just don’t do it. It does not mean that one reason is better than two, just that by invoking more than one reason you are trying to convince yourself to do something. Obvious decisions (robust to error) require no more than a single reason.

– Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

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How to mint gossip-worthy news

Word of mouth, then, is a prime tool for mak­ing a good im­pres­sion—as po­tent as that new car or Prada hand­bag. Think of it as a kind of cur­rency. So­cial cur­rency… So to get peo­ple talk­ing, com­pa­nies and or­ga­ni­za­tions need to mint so­cial cur­rency… There are three ways to do that: (1) find inner re­mark­a­bil­ity; (2) lever­age game me­chan­ics; and (3) make peo­ple feel like in­sid­ers.

– Jonah Berger, Contagious: Why Things Catch On

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On Brainstorming and Group Work

[I]t was the curious power of electronic collaboration that contributed to the New Groupthink in the first place. What created Linux, or Wikipedia, if not a gigantic electronic brainstorming session? But we’re so impressed by the power of online collaboration that we’ve come to overvalue all group work at the expense of solo thought. We fail to realize that participating in an online working group is a form of solitude all its own.

Susan Cain, Author, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

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Take a Break, Make a Breakthrough

Most people realize that they tend to perform best when they’re feeling positive energy. What they find surprising is that they’re not able to perform well or to lead effectively when they’re feeling any other way.  Unfortunately, without intermittent recovery, we’re not physiologically capable of sustaining highly positive emotions for long periods.

Tony Schwartz and Catherine McCarthy, Harvard Business Review, as cited.

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Why Everyone Should Chill Out

Any as­pect of life to which at­ten­tion is di­rected will loom large in a global eval­u­a­tion. This is the essence of the fo­cus­ing il­lu­sion, which can be de­scribed in a sin­gle sen­tence:

Noth­ing in life is as im­por­tant as you think it is when you are think­ing about it.

Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize-winning Economist, in Thinking, Fast and Slow

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Three Things Making Work Fulfilling

Those three things—au­ton­omy, com­plex­ity, and a con­nec­tion be­tween ef­fort and re­ward—are, most peo­ple agree, the three qual­i­ties that work has to have if it is to be sat­is­fy­ing. It is not how much money we make that ul­ti­mately makes us happy be­tween nine and five. It’s whether our work ful­fills us. If I of­fered you a choice be­tween being an ar­chi­tect for $75,000 a year and work­ing in a toll­booth every day for the rest of your life for $100,000 a year, which would you take?

Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers: The Story of Success

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Characterizing Resilience

“Resilient people […] possess three characteristics: a staunch acceptance of reality; a deep belief, often buttressed by strongly held values, that life is meaningful; and an uncanny ability to improvise.

 

You can bounce back from hardship with just one or two of these qualities, but you will only be truly resilient with all three.”

Diane L. Coutu, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, as cited.

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